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Clean Water and Sanitation (SDG 6)
Clean Water and Sanitation (SDG 6)
Water consumption per person
Volume of water used in the university: Total
1. In 2018, the water usage was 63,486 units in the Jin-De Campus, 16,296 units in the Bao-Shan Campus, and the total sum was 79,782 units.
2. Normally, the usage of groundwater is 3–4 times the usage of running water, which is estimated to be between 240,000 and 320,000 units.
3. Therefore, the school’s total water usage in a year is approximately between 320,000 and 400,000 units.

Volume of water used in the university: Inbound (treated/extracted water)
Resolved.

Volume of water used in the university: collected from rain water
Rainwater harvesting pools are available for sprinkler irrigation; no data collected.

Volume of water used in the university: reused/recycled water
We use running water and recycled water (through well water treatment).

Number of campus population


Water usage and care
Does your university as a body have a process in place to treat waste water?
Yes, our university has a wastewater treatment plant, and we process wastewater in accordance with legal regulations and procedures.

Does your university as a body have processes to prevent polluted water entering the water system, including pollution caused by accidents and incidents at the university?
Yes, we have hazard decontamination equipment to prevent sewage from entering the water system program, and to prevent the occurrence of major accidents and accident-induced pollution.


Does your university as a body provide free drinking water for students, staff and visitors, e.g. drinking water fountains)?
We have a total of 236 water dispensers installed at various units to allow students, faculty and staff, and visitors access to free drinking water.

Does your university as a body apply building standards to minimise water use? (relevant standards to be indicated)
1. All of our new buildings follow the technical specifications for designing rainwater storage and utilisation in buildings. For example, if the floor area of the main building exceeds 100,000 square meters, a rainwater harvesting pool is added.
2. All the water usage equipment that we have selected bear the water-saving label in accordance with the Water Supply Act.

Does your university as a body plant landscapes to minimise water usage? (e.g. use drought-tolerant plants)
Our sprinkler irrigation system for plants functions on the basis of using the smallest spray nozzles to cover the largest surface area. Furthermore, we restrict the time for irrigation to minimise water usage.

Water reuse
Volume of water used in the university: Total
From 320,000 units to 400,000 units.

Volume of water used in the university: reused/recycled water
Rainwater harvesting pools are available for sprinkler irrigation; no data collected.

Water in the community
Does your university as a body provide educational opportunities for local communities to learn about good water management?
We will co-ordinate with the university to apply for the Ministry of Education’s Higher Education Deep Plowing Project, ‘Wind, Sun, Water, Earth: Fangyuan Reborn’, which capitalises on opportunities to teach efficient water management practices in local communities, while also assisting in local sustainable development..

Does your university as a body actively promote conscious water usage?
We require electricians to periodically inspect and ensure that water usage is normal, and ask that each building’s management unit assists in the water management in their respective buildings, in the hopes of lowering unnecessary costs.


Does your university as a body support water conservation off campus?
Professor Wang Su-Fen from the Department of Geography conducted research on sustainable land development to improve the safety and sustainability of national land use. These studies included ‘Constructing an Assessment System for the Cross-Dimensional Social Impacts of Rainfall Disasters: Application of Multidimensional Scaling to Disasters and Social Impact Assessment’, ‘Assessing the Effectiveness of Water and Soil Conservation and Ecosystem Services under Disasters’, ‘Characteristics and Changes of Landslides Triggered by Typhoon Soudelor in Upstream Watershed of Xindian River’, ‘Effectiveness Assessment of Water and Soil Conservation and Ecosystem Services under Disasters’, ‘Assessing the Potential Impacts of Extreme Rainfall on Landslide Disasters in Mountainous Regions in Taichung’, ‘A Study on the Influence of Multidimensional Environmental Factors on Initiating Causes of Landslide Disasters’, ‘Gauging and Analysing the Potential Impacts of Rainfall-Triggered Landslide Disasters in the Laonong River Basin’, and ‘Correlation Analysis of the Impacts of Land-Use Changes in Kaoping River Basin on the Water Conservation of the Watershed’. Professor Wang also offered her advice on sustainable national development at the preparatory meeting for the ‘Resilient Taiwan - National Water Management Conference’ held by the Water Resources Agency and the ‘2019 Seminar for Users of the Alert System’ by the National Science and Technology Centre for Disaster Reduction.

Does your university as a body utilise sustainable water extraction technologies on associated university grounds off campus?
Professor Wang Su-Fen from the Department of Geography conducted research on sustainable land development to improve the safety and sustainability of national land use. These studies included ‘Constructing an Assessment System for the Cross-Dimensional Social Impacts of Rainfall Disasters: Application of Multidimensional Scaling to Disasters and Social Impact Assessment’, ‘Assessing the Effectiveness of Water and Soil Conservation and Ecosystem Services under Disasters’, ‘Characteristics and Changes of Landslides Triggered by Typhoon Soudelor in Upstream Watershed of Xindian River’, ‘Effectiveness Assessment of Water and Soil Conservation and Ecosystem Services under Disasters’, ‘Assessing the Potential Impacts of Extreme Rainfall on Landslide Disasters in Mountainous Regions in Taichung’, ‘A Study on the Influence of Multidimensional Environmental Factors on Initiating Causes of Landslide Disasters’, ‘Gauging and Analysing the Potential Impacts of Rainfall-Triggered Landslide Disasters in the Laonong River Basin’, and ‘Correlation Analysis of the Impacts of Land-Use Changes in Kaoping River Basin on the Water Conservation of the Watershed’. Professor Wang also offered her advice on sustainable national development at the preparatory meeting for the ‘Resilient Taiwan - National Water Management Conference’ held by the Water Resources Agency and the ‘2019 Seminar for Users of the Alert System’ by the National Science and Technology Centre for Disaster Reduction.



Does your university as a body cooperate with local, national, global governments on water security?

We act in accordance with the instructions of government regulations.
Yes, all operations abide by government rules.